Saline agriculture:

a practical solution to a global problem

 

We provide farmers with the means and knowledge of saline agriculture,
in an effort to combat salinization and to improve food security,
with minimal impact on already scarce fresh water supplies

Setting up Saline agriculture test locations on Bonaire

April 21, 2020

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is a crisis unlike any we’ve seen. Food export and import have been affected in many parts of the world due to the restriction on transportation. Salt Farm Foundation has been receiving various emails from countries such as the Maldives and Nepal which have been affected due to restrictions in trade.…

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Report – Seaweed as fertilizer and biostimulant

March 31, 2020

Louis Bolk Instituut at the request of Salt Farm Foundation has made a report on the potential of using Seaweed and algae extract as leaf fertilizer and biostimulant in the cultivation of salt-tolerant potato. This report was made possible with the support of the project – Interreg North Sea Region SalFar. Read the abstract and…

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SalFar report on International Farmers cafe 2019

March 27, 2020

Interested to know of which crop farmers were most curious to know the salt tolerance? Read this report on the International Farmers cafe that was organised as a part of the Saline Future Conference in September 2019. This report was developed by our project partners as a part of the Interreg North-Sea region SalFar. Report…

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Saline Farming: An innovative method of farming to cope with climate change

September 4, 2019

Climate change and sea level rise cause saltwater to intrude in farmlands. Experts are looking for solutions that prevent the loss of food production capability where saline farming could very well be the solution. From 10-13 September the Saline Futures Conference will take place in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands to put the potential of saline farming…

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Worldwide, large areas of agricultural land are lost every day due to salinization. Land that is much needed for food production to feed the growing world population.

Salinization of farmland causes crops to fail. Farmers can no longer grow food on their land, which causes famine, poverty and social disruption.

At the moment, 63 Million ha of all irrigated farmland is salt-affected, and this number increases at the rate of 2000 ha per day.

Thousands of farmers around the world are suffering from this problem, the yearly salt damage in crops is about $27 BILLION!

Only
%
of the water in the world is fresh water
%
of the available 2% fresh water is for domestic consumption
Of which
%
is used for agriculture

We have developed methods to cultivate salt tolerant crops on salt-affected farmland, something that had always seemed impossible. In addition to (re)using degraded lands to produce food, we also use brackish water instead of fresh water to grow crops.

We produce more food with less water.